Ingredients:

For tofu dumplings with spinach:

  • 80 grams Shiratama-ko rice flour
  • 100 grams soft tofu
For regular tofu dumplings:
  • 80 grams Shiratama-ko rice flour
  • 100 grams soft tofu
Suggested jam toppings: rhubarb jam, strawberry jam, pumpkin jam

Cooking Instructions: (for both types of dumpling)

  1. First, lets prepare the spinach dumplings. Lightly boil the spinach. After boiling, wring out the water and dice it into fine bits.
  2. Add the rice flour to the diced spinach. Then, slowly add tofu to the mixture until it becomes about as soft as an earlobe.
  3. Form the mixture into child bite-sized dumplings, making an indentation in the middle of each with your thumb, which will shorten the cooking time.
  4. Let’s next prepare the regular dumplings, following the above instructions without the spinach.
  5. Insert the dumplings in a pot of boiling water and boil for one minute after they naturally float to the surface. After removing from the boiling water, cool the dumplings in a bowl of cold water.
  6. Place two or three of each type of dumpling on plates, and garnish with your choice of jam.
Watch out for: When mixing the tofu and rice flour, be sure to add the tofu a little at a time so that you can control the hardness and water content of the final mixture. The smoother the dumpling mix turns out, the better the finished product will be.
✦ This recipe is courtesy of Mr. Onishi, the nutritionist at the Saroma Town Hall. The recipe originally appeared in the September 2009 issue of the Saroma Town Magazine. View it in the magazine here. (it’s on the second page of the PDF.)

3 Responses to “Saroma Recipe: Tofu Dumplings with Jam Topping”  

  1. 1 ryan s

    I like “as soft as an earlobe” as a description for dough consistency. It’s really concise and really specific.

  2. 2 Sean

    Indeed. When I was reading that for translation, I had to look that one up, and then double check with someone. I think it’s an example of how languages depend on lexically cliched phrases to express shared meanings. This is just how Japanese would describe dough, even though this kind of construction would be the sort of thing that a novelist would spend effort trying to cleverly think up.

  3. 3 ryan s

    Indeed. That’s really why I noticed it. My seventh grade English teacher would call it “a memorable turn of phrase.”

    Kinda wish I remembered his name. He made me read “Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance” and “Steppenwolf.”

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